Mentoring

WHY MENTOR?

Mentoring, at its core, guarantees young people that there is someone who cares about them, assures them they are not alone in dealing with day-to-day challenges, and makes them feel like they matter. Research confirms that quality mentoring relationships have powerful positive effects on young people in a variety of personal, academic, and professional situations. Ultimately, mentoring connects a young person to personal growth and development, and social and economic opportunity. Yet one in three young people will grow up without this critical asset.

DAILY LIFE

By being a consistent adult presence in a young person’s life mentors can offer advice, share life their experiences, and help a young person navigate challenges.

Youth who meet regularly with their mentors are:

46% less likely than their peers to start using illegal drugs and 27% less likely to start drinking. (Public/Private Ventures study of Big Brothers Big Sisters)

Young adults who face an opportunity gap but have a mentor are: 81% more likely to participate regularly in sports or extracurricular activities than those who do not. (The Mentoring Effect, 2014)

A study showed that the strongest benefit from mentoring, and most consistent across risk groups, was a reduction in depressive symptoms — particularly noteworthy given that almost one in four youth reported worrisome levels of these symptoms at baseline. (The Role of Risk, 2013)

Mentoring promotes positive social attitudes and relationships. Mentored youth tend to trust their parents more and communicate better with them. (The Role of Risk, 2013)

CAREER

One study estimates that the human potential lost as a result of the educational achievement gap is the economic equivalent of a permanent national recession. (Mentoring: At the crossroads of education, business and community, 2015) By preparing young people for college and careers, mentoring helps develop the future workplace talent pipeline. (Mentoring: At the crossroads of education, business and community, 2015) Mentors can also prepare their mentees for professional careers and assist with their workplace skills by:

  • Helping set career goals and taking the steps to realize them.
  • Using personal contacts to help young people network with industry professionals, find internships, and locate possible jobs.
  • Introduce young people to resources and organizations they may not be familiar with.
  • Skills for seeking a job, interviewing for a job, and keeping a job.

The number of ways mentoring can help a young person are as varied as the people involved in each program. While the lists and statistics can be impressive, personal stories can be even more impressive. Take a look at some mentoring success stories to see the impact of mentoring in real life.

The National Mentoring Resource Center serves as a comprehensive and reliable resource for training and technical assistance at the local program level, while also providing mentoring tools, resources, and reviews of mentoring research and best practices.

THE BUSINESS CASE FOR PRIVATE-SECTOR ENGAGEMENT IN QUALITY YOUTH MENTORING

The National Mentoring Partnership (MENTOR) released a report “Mentoring: at the crossroads of education, business and community.” The report examines how top US businesses collaborate with the public and non-profit sectors to connect youth in their communities to transformative mentoring relationships and the value gained by the business and its employees. According to MENTOR’s report, The Mentoring Effect, youth with mentors are more likely to be successful in school, leaders in their communities, and to enter young adulthood with opportunities for ongoing education and career choices. And yet, 16 million American young people—one in three—will reach the age of 19 without having had a mentor of any kind. The joint report examines the private sector role in addressing this mentoring gap and provides effective practices and case studies from local businesses and Fortune 500 companies.  Click HERE for the summary of the report.